Facilities Planning

The Plymouth School District is undergoing a thoughtful evaluation of its facilities, and is engaging community members to get their input on potential initiatives.

 

Frequently asked questions

Why study facilities?

What has happened so far?

What’s next?

What are the high-priority areas?

What is needed for the science curriculum?

What is needed for the health careers curriculum?

What is needed for the physical education curriculum?

What is a multi-purpose facility?

What is needed for Food Service?

How much will it cost?

 

Why study facilities?

Our facilities have served this community well for generations, and we have done an excellent job of maintaining them with our given resources. We are especially proud of the progress we have made in recent years to better prepare our students for college and jobs in our area. Looking toward the future, we want to be sure we have what we need to continue helping all students become their best through successful learning experiences.

What are the goals?

An extensive analysis throughout the 2016-17 school year identified several areas for improvement:

  • Expanded learning opportunities for high school students
    • Remodeled Science facilities, which are original to the building, with modernized labs to provide a strong foundation in support of the Science & Technology Center and the Food Science & Agriculture Center.
    • Enhanced Culinary Arts kitchens, to keep up with the significantly increased demand for these classes
    • New Health Careers curriculum, including the addition of pre-nursing and medical terminology classes
  • Better access to education, wellness and recreation for our students and community
  • Improved safety/security
    • More secure, convenient visitor access to School, District and Community Ed & Rec offices.
    • Safer traffic patterns for school buses and passenger vehicles
 

What has happened so far?

  • Fall 2016: The District Leadership Team studied and developed a complete list of facility needs.
  • Winter 2017: A prioritization system based on importance and urgency was developed.
  • Spring 2017: The district worked with its architect to explore ways to address top priorities.
  • June 2017: The district hired Miron Construction as project manager, to help with design specifications and project estimates.
  • June 2017: A Board of Education subcommittee began meeting regularly to explore ways to address the priorities.
  • August-September 2017: The district conducted community member focus groups to get feedback.

What’s next?

The district will continue to engage community members in developing a vision for the future, including:
  • October 2017: Community-wide survey
  • November 2017: Recommendations made based on feedback from the focus groups and the community survey
 

High-priority areas

Fairview Elementary School

Originally built in 1956 and opened in 1957, Fairview had updates/additions in 1985. While the building has been well-maintained, the following needs have been identified:

  1. Secure entrance: A relocated main office would better control visitor access.
  2. Add 2-court gymnasium: The small size of the existing gym limits class and community wellness activities.
  3. Add cafeteria & kitchen: Students currently are served in a hallway and eat in the foyer.
  4. Art & music classrooms: The current art room is in the basement, with no natural light and accessibility issues.
  5. Expand air conditioning: A building-wide HVAC update would create a better learning environment.

Parkview Elementary School

Originally built in 1956 and opened in 1957, Parkview had updates/additions in 1960 and 1985. While the building has been well-maintained, the following needs have been identified:

  1. Secure entrance: A relocated main office would better control visitor access.
  2. Add 2-court gymnasium: The small size of the existing gym limits class and community wellness activities.
  3. Expand cafeteria & kitchen: The existing facilities are too small and outdated to serve the current student enrollment.
  4. Expand air conditioning: A building-wide HVAC update would create a better learning environment.

Plymouth High School

  1. Secure entrance: A renovated main office would better control visitor access.
  2. Parking/traffic improvements: School bus lanes would be separated from vehicle drop-off areas.
  3. Renovated science labs: Updated the original classrooms with modernized labs would facilitate experiments and team problem-solving, creating a strong foundation in support of the Science & Technology Center and the Food Science & Agriculture Center.
  4. Renovate & expand culinary arts: Participation in these classes has increased significantly, creating a need for additional kitchen equipment.
  5. Create health science career classrooms: New curriculum in this high-demand area would include pre-nursing and medical terminology classes.
  6. Renovate & expand kitchen and cafeteria: Original to the building, these spaces are in need of updating. Redesigning the cafeteria more as a commons would be more inviting and useful to students.
  7. Centralized offices: Centralized District and Community Ed & Rec offices would enhance visitor access.
  8. New Fitness Center and girls locker room: The girls locker rooms were built when they just played intramurals, and are no longer adequate for the number of girls in physical education classes and competitive sports. The basement Fitness Center lacks adequate ventilation and is too small to meet student and community needs.
  9. Multi-purpose indoor facility: This versatile facility could be used in a wide variety of ways for physical education, academic programming, community events and recreation, lifetime fitness activities, and school and community youth groups (including soccer, baseball, softball, golf, football, cross country, track and field, and marching band practice). Learn more about a multi-purpose indoor facility

What about Riverview and Horizon?

Horizon and Riverview are our most up-to-date buildings. Although they have some needs for update and repair, the projects can be achieved through our regular operating budgets and an on-going priority system.

 

How much will it cost?

Given the ditrict's healthy financial situation and historically low interest rates, the Board of Education believes this is a good time to consider our options.

The cost to address all of the projects listed above is $31.9 million. The impact on the mill rate is expected to be $95 for each $100,000 of property value.

The district mill rate has declined each of the past 3 years and remains one of the lowest in our county, and among the lowest 25 percent in the state. It was $8.33 per $1,000 in 2016-17 and is expected to drop near $8 for 2017-18.