Facilities Information

The Plymouth School District is looking forward to updating school facilities, now that voters have approved the April 3 referendum.

We appreciate the support of the community, and will continue to provide information on this web page as the facility upgrades become reality.

 

 

o More secure, convenient visitor access to School, District and Community Ed & Rec offices

- School offices would be relocated with a direct view of the main door.
- District and Community Education & Recreation offices would be relocated toward the front of the PHS building, to provide easier access for visitors.
- Schools would be able to close off areas of the building during times when the community is using the building.

o Safer traffic patterns for school buses and passenger vehicles

o District-wide security and communications system upgrade

o Improved Science facilities with renovated modern labs, providing a strong foundation to support our Science & Technology curriculum

o New Health Careers curriculum, including pre-nursing and medical terminology classes, in response to expected shortages in health-care fields

o Enhanced Culinary Arts kitchens, which will allow students to earn culinary certifications

o Updated Physical Education facilities at the elementary schools and high school, with more space for year-round, indoor activities to provide more variety for students and more opportunities for community use

o Renovated Food Service facilities, with updated cafeterias

o Fall 2016: Working with consultants, the District Leadership Team developed a complete list of facility needs.

o Winter 2017: Prioritization system based on importance and urgency was developed.

o Spring 2017: District worked with its architect to explore ways to address top priorities.

o June 2017: District hired Miron Construction as project manager, to help with design specifications and project estimates.

o June 2017: Board of Education Facilities Subcommittee began meeting regularly to explore ways to address the priorities.

o August-September 2017: District conducted focus groups with community members to get feedback.

o October-November 2017: School Perceptions conducted a community-wide survey, which showed strong support for the proposed updates.

o November 2017: Board Facilities Subcommittee recommended proceeding with a referendum.

o December 2017: Board of Education voted to proceed with a referendum.

o April 2018: Voters approved the referendum question, supporting facility upgrades.

Plymouth High School

o Spring 2018: Discussions with architect and construction manager
o Summer 2018: Detailed plans are finalized
o Fall 2018: Projects are bid; work on the addition begins
o Winter 2019: Work continues on the addition
o Spring 2019: Work continues on the addition
o Summer 2019: Addition completed; PHS academic remodeling
o Summer 2020: Completion of any remaining projects (may be done earlier, if construction schedules allow)

Parkview Elementary School

o Fall 2018: Discussions with architect and construction manager
o Winter 2018-19: Detailed plans are finalized
o Spring 2019: Elementary projects are bid; work begins on the Parkview addition
o Summer 2019: Parkview construction completed

Fairview Elementary School

o Fall 2018: Discussions with architect and construction manager
o Winter 2018-19: Detailed plans are finalized
o Spring 2019: Elementary projects are bid
o Summer 2019: Work begins on the Fairview addition
o Late 2019: Fairview construction completed

Originally built in 1956 and opened in 1957, Fairview had updates/additions in 1985.

Fairview floor plan

o Secure entrance: A relocated main office would better control visitor access. (#1)

o Add 2-court gymnasium (similar to what is at Horizon): The small size of the existing gym limits class and community wellness activities. (#2) Learn more about the proposed elementary gyms.

o Add cafeteria & kitchen: Students currently are served in a hallway and eat in the foyer. (#3)

o Art & music classrooms: The current art room is in the basement, with no natural light and accessibility issues. (#4)

o Expand air conditioning: A building-wide HVAC update would create a better learning environment.

Learn more about the proposed elementary projects.

Originally built in 1956 and opened in 1957, Parkview had updates/additions in 1960 and 1985

Parkview floor plan

o Secure entrance: A relocated main office would better control visitor access. (#1)

o Add 2-court gymnasium (similar to what is at Horizon): The small size of the existing gym limits class and community wellness activities. (#2) Learn more about the proposed elementary gyms.

o Expand cafeteria & kitchen: The existing facilities are too small and outdated to serve the current student enrollment. (#3)

o Expand air conditioning: A building-wide HVAC update would create a better learning environment.

Learn more about the proposed elementary projects.

PHS, which opened in the fall of 1967, celebrated its 50th anniversary last year.

PHS floor plan

o Secure entrance: A renovated main office would better control visitor access. (#1)

o Parking/traffic improvements: School bus lanes would be separated from vehicle drop-off areas. (#2)

o Renovated Science labs: Update the original classrooms with modernized labs to facilitate experiments and team problem-solving, creating a strong foundation in support of the Science & Technology Center and the Food Science & Agriculture Center. (#3)

o Renovate & expand Culinary Arts: Participation in these classes has increased significantly, creating a need for additional kitchen equipment. (#4)

o Create Health Careers classrooms: New curriculum in this high-demand area would include pre-nursing, therapy, and medical terminology classes. (#5)

o Renovate & expand Kitchen and Cafeteria: Original to the building, these spaces are in need of updating. Redesigning the cafeteria as a commons would be more inviting and useful to students. (#6)

o Centralized offices: Centralized District and Community Ed & Rec offices would provide more security and more convenient visitor access. (#7)

o New Fitness Center and girls locker room: The girls locker rooms are no longer adequate for the number of girls in physical education classes and competitive sports. The basement Fitness Center lacks adequate ventilation and is too small to meet student and community needs. (#8)

o Multi-purpose indoor facility: This highly versatile space could be used in a wide variety of ways for physical education, academic programming, community events and recreation, lifetime fitness activities, and school and community youth groups. (#9) Learn more about the proposed multi-purpose facility.

o Horizon and Riverview are our most up-to-date buildings. Although some updates and repairs are needed, these projects can be achieved through our regular operating budget and maintenance priority system.

Multi-purpose facility artist's rendering
Artist's rendering

o Such a facility supports physical education & health curriculum, as well as a wide variety of community and extracurricular activities.

o The space could be divided into as many as four smaller areas, so several groups could utilize it simultaneously.

o Physical education classes

o Academic programming

o Lifetime fitness activities

o School and community teams, including:
- Baseball
- Cross Country
- Football
- Golf
- Soccer
- Softball
- Track & Field

o Marching band practices

o Community events and recreation

o Unlike a fieldhouse, which has a wooden floor and is used primarily for basketball & volleyball, a multi-purpose facility has a turf floor and can be used by many groups for many different purposes – sometimes simultaneously.

o Spring activities can be move into the multi-purpose facility as necessary, leaving the gym open for basketball leagues and similar programs.

o The initial and ongoing costs of a multi-purpose facility are significantly lower. A multi-purpose facility is estimated to cost about $5.2 million, at least $2 million less than a fieldhouse.

o Improved Science facilities with modern labs would provide a strong foundation to support our science and technology curriculum.

Current science classroom

o The existing science labs are original to the building, which opened more than 50 years ago. Their life expectancy has been extended through diligent maintenance, but updates to the plumbing and the chemical tabletops are needed.

o The rooms originally were designed for fewer students, which makes for crowded learning space. Desks are organized in rows amid the lab stations – great for listening to teacher lectures but not conducive to team problem-solving.

o Plans call for moving some walls and incorporating teacher prep areas to make larger classrooms, which would better separate lab space (for conducting experiments) from workspace (for teams to gather to go over their findings).

o Facility changes also would allow PHS to offer some smaller seminar and independent study classes.

o The district also wants to introduce more students to newer scientific technology, such as the digital probes used in the Food Science & Agriculture Center.

o In response to expected shortages in health-care fields, PHS plans to offer new health-care courses, including pre-nursing, medical terminology, and occupational and physical therapy classes.

Hallway outside special education classrooms

o Plans call for creation of a Health Careers Center in the rooms across from the PHS pool balcony, which currently are occupied by Student Services and special education.

(Student Services would move to a centralized location at the front of the school with other district offices.)

o A new training room under consideration would double as a pre-med classroom, where those looking to enter health fields could learn while helping student athletes.

o The district would partner with local colleges to develop the curriculum and equip the labs. PHS students could use the facilities during the day, and college students and adult learners could use them in the evenings, as is currently done in the LTC-Plymouth Science & Technology Center.

o Expanding the Culinary Arts kitchens would help keep up with significantly increased demand for these classes and allow students to earn culinary certifications.

o Updated kitchen equipment and modernized cafeterias would foster the district’s emphasis on the wellness of the whole child.

Food cart and tables in Fairview lobby

o Fairview does not have a cafeteria or kitchen. Students get their food from mobile carts set up in the hallway and eat at tables set up in the foyer.

o Parkview has a small cafeteria and a small kitchen, but neither are big enough to serve the current student population without impacting academic schedules.

o The PHS kitchen also is too small to meet the current nutrition program, which increasingly makes use of ingredients grown in the Food Science & Agriculture Center and in the PHS garden, as well as by local farmers.

Tables in PHS cafeteria

o In addition, the PHS cafeteria looks much as it did when the school opened more than 50 years ago; making it into more of a commons would better facilitate student groups collaborating on projects. Enhanced outdoor seating could encourage students to get a bit of fresh air during their lunch period.

o Updated Physical Education facilities would provide more space for year-round, indoor activities to offer more variety for students and more opportunities for community use.

o The district has been a leader in emphasizing the wellness of the whole child, and adequate gym space is a key part of that.

Parkview gym

o The small gyms at Fairview and Parkview limit the number of stations that P.E. teachers can have set up at any one time, which means students must wait for a turn. Larger, two-court gyms like that at Horizon would allow for twice as much student movement in the same amount of time. Larger gyms also offer a viable indoor recess option for those days when it is too cold to play outside.

o A multi-purpose indoor facility at PHS could be used by gym classes, most athletic teams, the marching band, and other extracurricular groups.

o The current weight room/fitness center, located in the PHS basement, lacks adequate ventilation and is too small to meet current demand. Plans call for a new, larger facility at ground level.

o The girls locker rooms were built when they played only intramurals, and are no longer adequate for the number of girls in physical education classes and competitive sports.

o Community members could join the new Fitness Center, which would replace the small facility in the PHS basement.

o Community Ed & Rec could use the multi-purpose facility for large community events, and the elementary gyms for youth and adult recreation programs.

o Bigger elementary gyms would relieve some of the demand for gym space in our community, which does not have a YMCA or similar facility.

o The updates would help us develop graduates who are better prepared to be employees and community members in the 21st century.

o The enhancements would help attract new families and faculty to our district.

o The Health Careers Center facilities could be used by PHS students during the day, and by college students and adult learners in the evenings, as is currently done in the LTC-Plymouth Science & Technology Center.

o Given the district’s fiscal responsibility and historically low interest rates, the Board of Education believes this is a good time to move forward with the proposed borrowing.

o The estimated cost to address all of the projects listed above is $31.9 million.

Fairview: approximately $6.1 million

Parkview: approximately $4.3 million

PHS: approximately $21.5 million

PLEASE NOTE: We have been asked for a cost breakdown, so we are providing one below. Please keep in mind that these amounts are estimates. In addition, many of the projects are interrelated and their individual costs are difficult to isolate.
-Office, Entrance, Communications, Safety And Security: $1.7 million
-Science Classroom and Culinary Arts Renovation: $2.6 million
-Kitchen and Cafeteria Renovations: $1.8 million
-Gym and Boys Locker Room Renovation: $0.8 million
-Site and Traffic Improvements: $1.2 million
-Fitness Center/Girls Locker Room Addition: $8.2 million
-Multi-Purpose Facility Addition: $5.2 million

o The district mill is one of the lowest in our county and among the lowest 25 percent in the state.

Mill Rate comparison chart

o The district mill rate declined 20 cents to $8.13 for 2017-18, the third decline in three years.

o If the referendum passes, the mill rate for debt payments would increase by 95 cents per $1,000 of property value, resulting in an estimated total mill rate of $9.08 (assuming operational expenses remain stable).

Source: Robert W. Baird. Assumptions: Two-phased borrowing with an estimated interest rate of 4.00-4.25%. Mill rate based on annual growth in equalized value of 1.10% for four years and 0.00% thereafter.

o This referendum would have an estimated impact of 95 cents on the mill rate or $95 on a $100,000 property, beginning in 2018-19.

It is anticipated that the funds for the project would be borrowed in phases, over two years. Each debt issue would be amortized for 20 years at an estimated interest rate of 4.00-4.25%.

Mill Rate over time

o Calculate your own tax impact from the referendum:

(Source: Robert W. Baird. Assumptions: All other expenses and revenue remain stable.)

TIP: Don't use a dollar sign or comma with the number.

Fair Market Value: 
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Annual Tax Increase: 
$


Monthly Tax Increase: 
$